Our girls loved visiting the local elementary school. The Garden Club was the perfect crowd as the chickens -- Racy Lacy, Agnes & Rita Bonita -- nibbled on all sorts of bugs and worms in the Wildcat Mountain Elementary School in Highlands Ranch, CO.
 
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It's common for ranchers to lose livestock from time to time. Coyotes. Hawks. Weather. Illness. There are so many factors out of our control that can contribute to a loss. Unfortunately, this doesn't make it any easier. We lost our Buff Orpington chick. I named her "Butter" and grew attached. Ranchers know not to get attached and I've learned that lesson early on in our backyard ranch. My plan is to wait until next year to replace her. We'll see how we do with our Rhode Island Reds and the Silver Laced Wyandotte through this year and then if all goes well, we'll buy another Orp. She was the only chick that had that traditional, cute, fuzzy, yellow likeness and I miss seeing her with the other girls.
 
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As part of the home farming movement, we started our backyard ranch in the Spring of 2011 with a small clutch of chicks from our local ranchers supply store Murdoch's. We live in a large urban community with over 95,000 homes so for most people, the concept was a little foreign. Raise chickens in your backyard? What were we going to do with them? Are they boys or girls? Where are you going to keep them? These were just some of the more common questions and/or concerns. Well, it seems rather practical to me. I decided to raise chickens to teach my five-year-old son some basic ranching and of course for the fresh eggs!